Downtown Public Art

posted by on Friday, August 28, 2015

Public Art

The public art in downtown Cedar Falls is both eye catching and perfectly at home around the district.  The downtown is home to six pieces, which bring culture and an aesthetic beauty that is unique to Cedar Falls.  As you view these beautiful sculptures, you may have wondered: what is the inspiration behind the design? And what about the artist that created them?

“Showtime”

A tribute to Merle Blair, an innovative past owner of the Oster Regent Theatre, Showtime has been a landmark on Main Street since it’s unveiling in 2013.  The creator, Thelma Welsh, aimed to capture Blair’s characteristics in this tribute to his work throughout the years.

“Drop Leaf Chicken”

This familiar piece is located outside of the Cedar Falls Public Library.   The artist, Scott Wallace, created the chicken perched on its table from sheet bronze.  “The piece is intended to reflect American domestic culture… specifically, a decorative chicken, a drop leaf table, a lace dolly, and the shapes often found within wallpaper patterns.”

“It’s All Relative”

Jerry Cowger has created art sculptures all across Iowa.  This piece aims to capture the ever changing pursuit that life displays as it moves and grows.  It can be viewed on the corner of 2nd and Main Street surrounded by a bed of flowers.

“allure”

Robert Craig has commissioned and exhibited his art all around the country.  “This major sculpture was inspired by Cedar Falls’ architecture and landscape, the Cedar River, and the sense of renewal and energy present along Main Street.”  This sculpture is located at 3rd and Main Street.

“Ebb Tide”

Tom Stancliffe was greatly influenced by his observations of the warm ocean waters and the life that lived within it.  This unique piece can be seen at the corner of 4th and Main Street.

"Gateway to the Trails"

Bruce White uses stainless steel, aluminum, bronze and granite to create elegant large-scale sculptures.  This sculpture, located in Peter Melendy Park, stands an impressive 18 feet tall.

  1. art